One Billion Years of Carbon
One Billion Years of Carbon

If you peel back the ego, a body is merely one billion years of raw carbon. In our humblest from, humans are nothing more than a microcosm of the surrounding natural world. But how does one merge two entities that struggle to find cohabitation?

By utilizing the organic and minimalist principles of the Japanese design technique, Kare-sansui (dry rock gardening), I attempted to render the pealing back of permanence to reveal the notion that life will always ebb and flow: every step gives new perspective and every glance brings new growth. Enjoy the change not because it is inevitable but because it is something new.

 

One Billion Years of Carbon
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Recollection Opacity
Recollection Opacity

Like a dark summer rain storm, a delicate spring blossom, or the gentle ripples on a lake, memories too will dissipate, but they will inevitably be replenished by new ones. Every memory we have is just a reconstruction of the last recollection. Therefore, the strongest sensations will only be felt in the moment which they are viscerally experienced. So why try to preserve what will certainly wither and fade? Enjoy this moment because it is the best you will ever remember it.

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Documentation_Benjamin_Eisenberg1.jpg
Borrowed Borders
Borrowed Borders

Every year, over five hundred different bird species cross the skies of Israel’s Hula Valley as they migrate from Europe to Africa. The birds soar over-head as parents are ripped away from children because an arbitrary line is drawn in the sand.

This piece interweaves the calls of birds from contested territories around the world: from the high altitude lakes of the Tibetan Plateau to the Antarctic waters of the Falkland Islands. The calls of these birds, downloaded from online sources, represent a longing for unity, to regenerate community through decomposing notions of separatism and political divide because a boundary is only as strong as the fear that inspired its composition.

Borrowed Borders

Disputed Territories Represented

Tibet - China and Tibet

Kashmir – Pakistan and India

Falkland Islands – United Kingdom and Chile

Taiwan – China and Taiwan

Golan Heights – Israel and Syria

Crimea – Russia and Ukraine

Lunchinda-Pweto Province - DRC and Zambia

Ambalata – Malaysia and Indonesia

Borrowed Borders
Borrowed Borders
Documentation_Benjamin_Eisenberg1 .jpg
One Billion Years of Carbon
One Billion Years of Carbon
IMG_1962.jpg
IMG_1970.jpg
IMG_1992.jpg
IMG_2000.jpg
IMG_2011.jpg
IMG_2013.jpg
IMG_2020.jpg
Recollection Opacity
Documentation_Benjamin_Eisenberg2.jpg
Documentation_Benjamin_Eisenberg.jpg
Documentation_Benjamin_Eisenberg1.jpg
Borrowed Borders
Borrowed Borders
Borrowed Borders
Documentation_Benjamin_Eisenberg1 .jpg
One Billion Years of Carbon

If you peel back the ego, a body is merely one billion years of raw carbon. In our humblest from, humans are nothing more than a microcosm of the surrounding natural world. But how does one merge two entities that struggle to find cohabitation?

By utilizing the organic and minimalist principles of the Japanese design technique, Kare-sansui (dry rock gardening), I attempted to render the pealing back of permanence to reveal the notion that life will always ebb and flow: every step gives new perspective and every glance brings new growth. Enjoy the change not because it is inevitable but because it is something new.

 

One Billion Years of Carbon
Recollection Opacity

Like a dark summer rain storm, a delicate spring blossom, or the gentle ripples on a lake, memories too will dissipate, but they will inevitably be replenished by new ones. Every memory we have is just a reconstruction of the last recollection. Therefore, the strongest sensations will only be felt in the moment which they are viscerally experienced. So why try to preserve what will certainly wither and fade? Enjoy this moment because it is the best you will ever remember it.

Borrowed Borders

Every year, over five hundred different bird species cross the skies of Israel’s Hula Valley as they migrate from Europe to Africa. The birds soar over-head as parents are ripped away from children because an arbitrary line is drawn in the sand.

This piece interweaves the calls of birds from contested territories around the world: from the high altitude lakes of the Tibetan Plateau to the Antarctic waters of the Falkland Islands. The calls of these birds, downloaded from online sources, represent a longing for unity, to regenerate community through decomposing notions of separatism and political divide because a boundary is only as strong as the fear that inspired its composition.

Borrowed Borders

Disputed Territories Represented

Tibet - China and Tibet

Kashmir – Pakistan and India

Falkland Islands – United Kingdom and Chile

Taiwan – China and Taiwan

Golan Heights – Israel and Syria

Crimea – Russia and Ukraine

Lunchinda-Pweto Province - DRC and Zambia

Ambalata – Malaysia and Indonesia

Borrowed Borders
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